Close
Type at least 1 character to search
Back to top

MAD

Interview with the Iranian street artist MAD:

I think art can take the form of protest, addressing political and social issues with direct action. Art can connect you to your senses, body, and mind. It can make people sympathize with and connect to each other, and hopefully it may cause a change in their way of thinking and acting.

You were born in 1987 in Tabriz, Iran, and have been active on the streets, in Iran and beyond, since 2008. How did you get into art, and what made you choose the street as your place of artistic creation?

I was born in Tabriz, the city where I met Icy and Sot, who are brothers and friends. We became very close friends and spent a lot of time together, skateboarding or doing parkour sports. We spent our days in the street of Tabriz, where these guys paint small stencils on the walls from time to time. So, I started to paint small stencils too, and it was the first time I felt that I could express myself better and show my feelings about certain topics by using walls and street art. Over the time it became my profession, and I have made many sacrifices for that.

If you weren’t an artist, what would you have become?

I studied computer science at university. I used to work as a web developer, but I chose to be an artist. I like it more and found it closer to my ideology. So I can say, if I wasn’t an artist, I would be a computer engineer.

You have changed your style over time but have always remained dedicated to the stencil technique. Can you tell us more about your artistic development and what has influenced your new style of works?

I think changing is part of many artists’ progress. The style of thinking and painting can change over time. There are many reasons to change your way of thinking and varying subjects, such as the environment, culture, language, age, etc. I mainly worked on social and political issues when I was living and working in Iran. Later, when I moved to Turkey, I started to work on different subjects and made my paintings to a higher artistic standard. I add more details, more colors, and more layers to my works now, and the stories they deal with have become more complex. I try to create fictional and fantasy worlds by mixing different elements and characters, sometimes based on mythological and divine stories blended with my own vision. A world where everything can happen and without any limits. But I’ve always been faithful to stencil. I like this technique and how fast it is.

REAL JOB I Tabriz, Iran I 2015

THE LAST ANGLEL I Istanbul, Turkey I 2019

Your works include critical social and cultural commentary with a dose of humor and metaphor, and revolve around topics such as censorship, humanity, and social problems. Do you think art can change society or even politics? 

Changing society or politics may be a little bit of a big word for it. But I think art can take the form of protest, addressing political and social issues with direct action. Art can connect you to your senses, body, and mind. It can make people sympathize with and connect to each other, and hopefully it may cause a change in their way of thinking and acting.

LOVE QUOTE I Istanbul, Turkey I 2018

SHEPHERNAUT I Istanbul, Turkey I 2018

What are your sources of inspiration? Are there other (urban) artists who inspire you?

The society we live in and all the matters we face in our daily life and the mechanization of everyday life, next to fictional and mythological, divine stories, have inspired me a lot in my works. I usually watch and follow many artists. I enjoy watching the process of development of my favorite artists. There are many artists who have inspired me a lot since I started painting, such as Moebius, Frank Frazetta, Banksy, Dolk, Pobel, Pejac, Aec Interesni Kazki, and many more. I truly admire their artworks.

PRETENCE I Tehran, Iran I 2012

RUNAWAY STAG I Istanbul, Turkey I 2020

You grew up in Iran, but for almost five years now, you have been living and working in Istanbul, Turkey. Considering the fact that street art and graffiti are still considered to be a crime in many countries, how would you describe the artistic climate and freedom, and the urban art scene in general, in these two countries?   

I want to start answering this question with a memory. When I came to Istanbul for the first time, I was invited to paint a mural inside the Boğaziçi University in Istanbul. It was my first trip to Turkey and I felt there where the same problems we had back in Iran, such as the lack of freedom of speech and many others. I felt the same pressures on people here in Istanbul. So, I decided to paint one of my works called “Rise against the system”. A rebel inside the glass jar wants to throw a stone at the glass, which symbolizes the system that controls the people. It shows how fragile the system can be, if we can understand its weaknesses. But of course, after one week, the university had to buff that painting because of the issues they were facing with the government.

I can say both Iran and Turkey have their own attractions. But working in Iran as a street artist is so dangerous. As far as I know there isn’t any particular law against graffiti or street art in Iran. So, you can be charged with anything including political crimes, even if your work has nothing to do with political issues. Whereas in Turkey, if you paint non-political things, it’s just ok. Painting in Istanbul in comparison with Tehran is easier, but of course, it also changes from neighborhood to neighborhood.

KNOCKOUT I Istanbul, Turkey I 2017

ORACLE I Istanbul, Turkey I 2019

Have you ever been caught doing illegal work?

Yes, I was caught in Iran several times. But I was lucky enough that nothing serious happened to me. I just got warned by the police. Here in Istanbul, I haven’t been caught, but I have been warned by the police several times when I have been painting.

TIME SOURCE I Izmir, Turkey I 2022

QUARANTINE I Izmir, Turkey I 2022

What determines free artistic practice for you?

As an Iranian citizen, it’s hard to travel around the world. Traveling freely could influence me a lot, because I love to travel and to know more about countries’ culture, their old mythological stories, their literature, their history, and many other things that can help me during my artistic creation.

UFO CRASH I Bali, Indonesia I 2017

RICE I Bali, Indonesia I 2017

What has been your most challenging and rewarding piece of work or project so far?

As I said, my new paintings have lots of details and colors and therefore layers. So, painting and cutting their stencils by hand takes so much time and effort. I can say they are really challenging for me. 

When my mural “Rise against the system,” a work I really liked, was buffed it seemed to me that it had fulfilled its mission and sent the message it should send. When they removed it, the students in that university were really pissed off and started protesting against censorship. I liked that, and I think it was my most rewarding project so far.

RISE AGAINST THE SYSTEM I Istanbul, Turkey I 2015

What’s next for you? 

I’m working on a collection of paintings, and I intend to have a solo exhibition in the U.S. or Europe soon, where I would like to travel this year, if it is possible. I’m also planning to participate in an art residency program and to extend my paintings on the street around the world.

UNTITLED I Izmir, Turkey I 2022

THE PASSAGE I Izmir, Turkey I 2022

MAD

Tabriz, Iran / Istanbul, Turkey

Website madstencils.com

Instagram mad_stencils 

Facebook Madstencils  

Vimeo madstencils

_______________________________________

 

Pictures © MAD

 

February 2022

by Laura Vetter

Interview mit dem iranischen Street Artist MAD:

Ich denke, dass Kunst die Form von Protest annehmen kann, indem sie politische und soziale Themen mit direkten Aktionen adressiert. Kunst kann dich mit deinen Sinnen, deinem Körper und deinem Geist verbinden. Sie kann dazu führen, dass Menschen miteinander sympathisieren und in Kontakt treten, und hoffentlich kann sie eine Veränderung in ihrem Denken und Handeln bewirken.

Du wurdest 1987 in Tabriz, Iran, geboren und bist seit 2008 auf der Straße aktiv, im Iran und im internationalen Raum. Wie bist du zur Kunst gekommen und warum hast du die Straße als Ort für dein künstlerisches Schaffen gewählt?

Ich wurde in Tabriz geboren, der Stadt, in der ich Icy und Sot kennengelernt habe, die Brüder und Freunde sind. Wir wurden sehr enge Freunde und verbrachten viel Zeit zusammen auf dem Skateboard oder beim Parkour-Sport. Wir waren täglich auf den Straßen von Tabriz unterwegs, wo die Jungs von Zeit zu Zeit kleine Stencils an die Wände malten. So fing ich auch an, kleine Stencils zu sprayen, und zum ersten Mal hatte ich das Gefühl, dass ich mich besser ausdrücken und meine Gefühle zu bestimmten Themen mithilfe von Wänden und Street Art zeigen kann. Im Laufe der Zeit wurde das zu meinem Beruf, und ich habe dafür viele Opfer gebracht.

Wenn du kein Künstler wärst, was wärst du dann geworden?

Ich habe Informatik an der Universität studiert. Früher habe ich als Webentwickler gearbeitet, aber ich habe mich entschieden, Künstler zu werden. Das hat mir mehr Spaß gemacht und entsprach eher meiner Ideologie. Ich kann also sagen, wenn ich kein Künstler wäre, wäre ich ein Computeringenieur.

Du hast deinen Stil im Laufe der Zeit verändert, bist aber immer der Stencil-Technik treu geblieben. Kannst du uns mehr über deine künstlerische Entwicklung erzählen und was deinen neuen Arbeitsstil beeinflusst hat?

Ich denke, Veränderungen gehören zum Fortschritt vieler Künstler. Der Stil des Denkens und Malens kann sich im Laufe der Zeit ändern. Es gibt viele Gründe, seine Denkweise zu ändern, und unterschiedliche Themen wie Umwelt, Kultur, Sprache usw. zu behandeln. Als ich im Iran lebte und arbeitete, habe ich mich hauptsächlich mit sozialen und politischen Themen beschäftigt. Später, als ich in die Türkei zog, begann ich, mich mit anderen Themen auseinanderzusetzen und meine Bilder auf ein höheres künstlerisches Niveau zu bringen. Ich füge jetzt mehr Details, mehr Farben und mehr Schichten zu meinen Werken hinzu, und die Geschichten, von denen sie handeln, sind komplexer geworden. Ich versuche, fiktive und fantasievolle Welten zu erschaffen, indem ich verschiedene Elemente und Charaktere mische, die manchmal auf mythologischen und religiösen Geschichten basieren und mit meiner eigenen Vision vermischt werden. Eine Welt, in der alles passieren kann und in der es keine Grenzen gibt. Aber ich bin Stencils immer treu geblieben. Ich mag diese Technik und wie schnell sie ist.

REAL JOB I Tabriz, Iran I 2015

THE LAST ANGLEL I Istanbul, Turkey I 2019

Deine Werke enthalten kritische soziale und kulturelle Kommentare mit einer Prise Humor und Metaphorik und drehen sich um Themen wie Zensur, Menschlichkeit und soziale Probleme. Glaubst du, dass Kunst die Gesellschaft oder sogar die Politik verändern kann? 

Die Gesellschaft oder die Politik zu verändern, ist vielleicht etwas zu hoch gegriffen. Aber ich denke, dass Kunst die Form von Protest annehmen kann, indem sie politische und soziale Themen mit direkten Aktionen adressiert. Kunst kann dich mit deinen Sinnen, deinem Körper und deinem Geist verbinden. Sie kann dazu führen, dass Menschen miteinander sympathisieren und in Kontakt treten, und hoffentlich kann sie eine Veränderung in ihrem Denken und Handeln bewirken.

LOVE QUOTE I Istanbul, Turkey I 2018

SHEPHERNAUT I Istanbul, Turkey I 2018

Was sind deine Inspirationsquellen? Gibt es andere (urbane) Künstler, die dich inspirieren?

Die Gesellschaft, in der wir leben, und all die Dinge, mit denen wir in unserem täglichen Leben konfrontiert werden, sowie die Technisierung des Alltags haben mich neben fiktionalen, mythologischen und religiösen Geschichten in meinen Werken sehr inspiriert. Normalerweise beobachte und verfolge ich viele Künstler. Ich genieße es, den Entwicklungsprozess meiner Lieblingskünstler zu beobachten. Es gibt viele Künstler, die mich sehr inspiriert haben, seit ich mit der Malerei begonnen habe, wie Moebius, Frank Frazetta, Banksy, Dolk, Pobel, Pejac, Aec Interesni Kazki und viele mehr. Ich bewundere ihre Kunstwerke sehr.

PRETENCE I Tehran, Iran I 2012

RUNAWAY STAG I Istanbul, Turkey I 2020

Du bist im Iran aufgewachsen, aber seit fast fünf Jahren lebst und arbeitest du in Istanbul, in der Türkei. In Anbetracht der Tatsache, dass Street Art und Graffiti in vielen Ländern immer noch als Verbrechen eingestuft werden, wie würdest du das künstlerische Klima und die Freiheit, und die urbane Kunstszene im Allgemeinen, in diesen beiden Ländern beschreiben?  

Ich möchte die Antwort auf diese Frage mit einer Erinnerung beginnen. Als ich zum ersten Mal nach Istanbul kam, wurde ich eingeladen, ein Wandbild in der Boğaziçi-Universität in Istanbul zu malen. Es war meine erste Reise in die Türkei und ich spürte, dass es dort die gleichen Probleme gab wie im Iran, wie z.B. das Fehlen der Redefreiheit und vieles mehr. Ich spürte, dass der gleiche Druck auf den Menschen hier in Istanbul lastete. Also beschloss ich, eines meiner Werke mit dem Titel “Rise against the system” zu malen. Ein Rebell in einem Glasgefäß will einen Stein auf das Glas werfen, das das System symbolisiert, das die Menschen kontrolliert. Es zeigt, wie zerbrechlich das System sein kann, wenn wir seine Schwächen verstehen. Aber natürlich musste die Universität das Werk nach einer Woche wieder entfernen, weil es Probleme mit der Regierung gab.

Ich kann sagen, dass sowohl der Iran als auch die Türkei ihre eigenen Reize haben. Aber im Iran als Street Artist zu arbeiten, ist sehr gefährlich. Soweit ich weiß, gibt es im Iran kein besonderes Gesetz gegen Graffiti oder Straßenmalerei. Du kannst also für alles angeklagt werden, auch für politische Straftaten, selbst wenn deine Arbeit nichts mit politischen Themen zu tun hat. In der Türkei hingegen ist es völlig in Ordnung, wenn du unpolitische Dinge malst. Im Vergleich zu Teheran ist das Malen in Istanbul einfacher, aber natürlich ist das auch von Viertel zu Viertel unterschiedlich.

KNOCKOUT I Istanbul, Turkey I 2017

ORACLE I Istanbul, Turkey I 2019

Wurdest du jemals bei illegalen Arbeiten erwischt?

Ja, ich wurde im Iran mehrere Male erwischt. Aber ich hatte das Glück, dass mir nichts Ernstes passiert ist. Ich wurde nur von der Polizei verwarnt. Hier in Istanbul wurde ich noch nicht erwischt, aber auch hier beim Malen schon mehrmals von der Polizei verwarnt.

TIME SOURCE I Izmir, Turkey I 2022

QUARANTINE I Izmir, Turkey I 2022

Was macht künstlerische Freiheit für dich aus?

Als iranischer Staatsbürger ist es schwer, um die Welt zu reisen. Das freie Reisen könnte mich sehr beeinflussen, denn ich liebe es zu reisen und mehr über die Kultur der Länder, ihre alten mythologischen Geschichten, ihre Literatur, ihre Geschichte und viele andere Dinge zu erfahren, die mir bei meinem künstlerischen Schaffen helfen können.

UFO CRASH I Bali, Indonesia I 2017

RICE I Bali, Indonesia I 2017

Was war bislang dein herausforderndstes und erfüllendstes Werk oder Projekt?

Wie ich schon sagte, haben meine neuen Bilder viele Details und Farben und damit Schichten. Das Malen und Ausschneiden der Schablonen von Hand erfordert also viel Zeit und Mühe. Ich kann sagen, dass sie eine echte Herausforderung für mich sind. 

Als mein Wandbild “Rise against the system”, ein Werk, das ich wirklich mochte, entfernt wurde, schien es mir, als hätte es seine Aufgabe erfüllt und die Botschaft gesendet, die es senden sollte. Als sie es übermalten, waren die Studenten der Universität wirklich sauer und begannen gegen die Zensur zu protestieren. Das hat mir gefallen, und ich glaube, das war mein bisher erfüllendstes Projekt.

RISE AGAINST THE SYSTEM I Istanbul, Turkey I 2015

Was steht bei dir als Nächstes an? 

Ich arbeite an einer Sammlung von Bildern und habe vor, bald eine Einzelausstellung in den USA oder Europa zu machen, wohin ich dieses Jahr gerne reisen würde, wenn es möglich ist. Außerdem plane ich, an einem Künstler-Residenz-Programm teilzunehmen und meine Werke auf den Straßen in der ganzen Welt zu verbreiten.

UNTITLED I Izmir, Turkey I 2022

THE PASSAGE I Izmir, Turkey I 2022

MAD

Tabriz, Iran / Istanbul, Türkei

Website madstencils.com

Instagram mad_stencils 

Facebook Madstencils  

Vimeo madstencils

_______________________________________

 

Bilder © MAD

 

Februar 2022

Laura Vetter

Intervista con lo street artist iraniano MAD:

Penso che l’arte possa assumere la forma di protesta, affrontando questioni politiche e sociali con un’azione diretta. L’arte può connetterti ai tuoi sensi, al tuo corpo e alla tua mente. Può far sì che le persone simpatizzino e si connettano tra loro, e si spera che possa indurre un cambiamento nel loro modo di pensare e di agire.

Sei nato nel 1987 a Tabriz, in Iran, e sei attivo in strada, in Iran e non solo, dal 2008. Come ti sei avvicinato all’arte e cosa ti ha fatto scegliere la strada come luogo di creazione artistica?

Sono nato a Tabriz, la città dove ho incontrato Icy e Sot, che sono fratelli e amici. Siamo diventati grandi amici e abbiamo passato parecchio tempo insieme facendo skateboard o parkour. A Tabriz trascorrevamo le nostre giornate in strada, dove questi ragazzi di tanto in tanto dipingevano piccoli stencil sui muri. Così, ho iniziato a dipingere piccoli stencil anch’io, ed è stato lì che ho sentito per la prima volta di potermi esprimere e mostrare il mio sentire su certi argomenti usando i muri e l’arte di strada. Con il tempo, e molti sacrifici, è diventata la mia professione.  

Se non fossi diventato un artista, cosa saresti?

Ho studiato informatica all’università. Lavoravo come sviluppatore web, ma ho scelto di fare l’artista. Mi piace di più e lo trovo più vicino alla mia ideologia. Quindi posso dire che se non fossi diventato un artista, sarei un ingegnere informatico. 

Nel tempo hai cambiato il tuo stile, ma sei sempre rimasto fedele alla tecnica dello stencil. Puoi dirci di più sul tuo sviluppo artistico e cos’ha influenzato il tuo nuovo stile di lavoro?

Penso che cambiare faccia parte del progresso di molti artisti. Lo stile di pensiero e di pittura può cambiare nel tempo. Ci sono molte ragioni all’origine del cambiamento del proprio modo di pensare e variare i soggetti, come l’ambiente, la cultura, la lingua, l’età, ecc. Quando vivevo e lavoravo in Iran lavoravo principalmente su temi sociali e politici. In seguito, quando mi sono trasferito in Turchia, ho iniziato a lavorare su soggetti diversi, portando i miei dipinti a uno standard artistico più elevato. Ora aggiungo più dettagli, più colori e più sfumature alle mie opere, e le storie che trattano sono diventate più complesse. Cerco di creare mondi immaginari e fantastici mettendo insieme diversi elementi e personaggi, a volte basati su storie mitologiche e divine mescolate con la mia visione personale. Un mondo senza limiti e dove tutto può accadere. Ma sono sempre stato fedele allo stencil. Mi piace questa tecnica e la sua velocità.

REAL JOB I Tabriz, Iran I 2015

THE LAST ANGLEL I Istanbul, Turchia I 2019

Le tue opere contengono un commento critico sociale e culturale, con una dose di umorismo e metafora, e ruotano intorno a temi come la censura, l’umanità e i problemi sociali. Pensi che l’arte possa cambiare la società o la politica? 

Cambiare la società o la politica è un parolone. Penso però che l’arte possa assumere la forma di protesta, affrontando questioni politiche e sociali con un’azione diretta. L’arte può connetterti ai tuoi sensi, al tuo corpo e alla tua mente. Può far sì che le persone simpatizzino e si connettano tra loro, e si spera che possa indurre un cambiamento nel loro modo di pensare e di agire.

LOVE QUOTE I Istanbul, Turchia I 2018

SHEPHERNAUT I Istanbul, Turchia I 2018

Quali sono le tue fonti di ispirazione? Ci sono altri artisti (urbani) che ti ispirano?

La società in cui viviamo e tutte le questioni che affrontiamo nel nostro quotidiano, nonché la meccanizzazione della vita di tutti i giorni, accanto a storie immaginarie e mitologiche, divine, hanno ispirato molto le mie opere. Di solito osservo e seguo molti artisti. Mi piace guardare il processo di sviluppo dei miei artisti preferiti. Da quando ho iniziato a dipingere, sono stati parecchi gli artisti che mi hanno ispirato, come Moebius, Frank Frazetta, Banksy, Dolk, Pobel, Pejac, Aec Interesni Kazki, e tanti altri. Ammiro davvero le loro opere d’arte.

PRETENCE I Tehran, Iran I 2012

RUNAWAY STAG I Istanbul, Turchia I 2020

Sei cresciuto in Iran, ma da quasi cinque anni vivi e lavori a Istanbul, in Turchia. Considerando il fatto che la street art e i graffiti sono ancora ritenuti un crimine in molti Paesi, come descriveresti il clima e la libertà artistica,  la scena urbana in generale, in questi due Paesi?   

Rispondo a questa domanda iniziando da un ricordo. Quando sono venuto a Istanbul per la prima volta, sono stato invitato a dipingere un murale all’interno dell’Università Boğaziçi. Era il mio primo viaggio in Turchia e ho sentito che c’erano gli stessi problemi che avevamo in Iran, tra questi la mancanza di libertà di parola. Ho sentito le stesse pressioni sulle persone qui a Istanbul. Così ho deciso di dipingere una delle mie opere, “Rise against the system”. Un ribelle dentro il vaso di vetro vuole lanciare una pietra contro il vetro, che simboleggia il sistema che controlla le persone. Mostra quanto può essere fragile il sistema, se riusciamo a capirne le debolezze. Ma naturalmente, a distanza di una settimana, l’università ha dovuto rinunciare a quel dipinto a causa dei problemi che avevano avuto con il governo.

Posso dire che sia l’Iran che la Turchia hanno le loro attrazioni. Ma lavorare in Iran come artista di strada è molto pericoloso. Per quanto ne so non c’è una legge particolare contro i graffiti o l’arte di strada in Iran. Quindi puoi essere accusato di qualsiasi cosa, compresi crimini politici, anche se il tuo lavoro non ha nulla a che fare con questioni politiche. Mentre in Turchia, se dipingi cose non politiche, va tutto bene. Dipingere a Istanbul rispetto a Teheran è più facile, ma ovviamente cambia anche da quartiere a quartiere.

KNOCKOUT I Istanbul, Turchia I 2017

ORACLE I Istanbul, Turchia I 2019

Sei mai stato sorpreso a fare un lavoro illegale?

Sì, mi è successo in Iran diverse volte. Sono stato per abbastanza fortunato e non mi è successo niente di grave. Sono stato solo avvertito dalla polizia. Qui a Istanbul non mi è mai successo, ma mentre dipingevo sono stato avvertito diverse volte dalla polizia.

TIME SOURCE I Izmir, Turchia I 2022

QUARANTINE I Izmir, Turchia I 2022

Cosa determina per te la pratica artistica libera?

Come cittadino iraniano, è difficile viaggiare per il mondo. Viaggiare liberamente potrebbe influenzarmi molto, perché amo viaggiare e conoscere meglio la cultura dei Paesi, le loro antiche storie mitologiche, la loro letteratura, la loro storia, e molte altre cose che possono aiutarmi durante la creazione artistica.

UFO CRASH I Bali, Indonesia I 2017

RICE I Bali, Indonesia I 2017

Qual è stato il lavoro o progetto più impegnativo e gratificante finora?

Come ho detto, i miei nuovi dipinti hanno molti dettagli e colori e quindi strati. Dipingere e tagliare i loro stencil a mano richiede molto tempo e fatica. Posso dire che sono davvero impegnativi. 

Quando il mio murale “Rise against the system”, un lavoro che mi è piaciuto molto, è stato lucidato, mi è sembrato che avesse compiuto la sua missione e inviato il messaggio che doveva inviare. Quando l’hanno rimosso, gli studenti di quell’università erano davvero incazzati e hanno iniziato a protestare contro la censura. Mi è piaciuto, e penso che sia stato il mio progetto più gratificante finora.

RISE AGAINST THE SYSTEM I Istanbul, Turchia I 2015

Quale sarà il tuo prossimo passo? 

Sto lavorando a una collezione di dipinti, e ho intenzione di fare presto una mostra personale negli Stati Uniti o in Europa, dove se possibile mi piacerebbe andare l’anno prossimo. Sto anche progettando di partecipare a un programma di residenza artistica e di portare i miei dipinti per strada in tutto il mondo.

UNTITLED I Izmir, Turchia I 2022

THE PASSAGE I Izmir, Turchia I 2022

MAD

Tabriz, Iran / Istanbul, Turchia

Website madstencils.com

Instagram mad_stencils 

Facebook Madstencils  

Vimeo madstencils

_______________________________________

 

Immagini  © MAD

 

Febbraio 2022

di Laura Vetter